Thursday, June 14, 2012

Chris Brogan Interview from Blogworld and Interviewing TIps





While I didn't have the good fortune to interview Chris Brogan at Blogworld, I did catch this video done by someone else, apparently from LASplash.com. While I love Chris and have met him several times as well as heard him speak, the video is a good example of what I would call a wasted opportunity. I'm posting it because Chris is awesome and always has great content, but the interviewer could have made a few changes that would have made a huge difference.

So, here are a few interviewing tips that I think would have helped this interviewer out a lot.


1. Be Prepared. 
The interviewer seemed to have no clue about Chris, including where he lived and other basic details about his achievements. How hard would it have been to look him up? Also, she seemed to suggest that Google Hangouts was not included in Chris's Google+ book, which it is. A little embarrassing for her, no?


2. Be Relevant.
The interviewer seemed to stray all over the place into areas that I found irrelevant, adding nothing to the discussion. Since Chris knows so much about social media, which is why he gives keynotes all over the place, how about asking him some pertinent questions that would provide for a meaningful discussion.


3. Hold the camera still.
You don't need to work in television to know that you can easily attach a camera stand, otherwise known as a gorilla flexible tripod(affiliate link) to keep your video camera from shaking all over the place.


4. Avoid Excessive "Umms."
If there is a pause in the conversation, allow the silence to pass and either edit it out later, or stop and start the camera again. The viewer should not be subjected to the annoying word "Umm" every 10 seconds.

5.  Live Up to Your Description.
If the video had stuck to its description, it would have been fine. Unfortunately it wandered all over the place, and any good social media tips were somewhat buried.

6. Back Up and Zoom Out
There is no reason to focus in so closely on your subject's face. If you zoom out a little, the viewer doesn't feel like they are being squeezed into the camera lense. There's a zoom on your camera, try it out.

So what do you think? Am I being too hard on this video with Chris? Comment here.



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